Fairfield Ledger
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Neighbors Growing Together | Jul 22, 2014

Hall sees five decades of change at his barbershop

By JEFF WILSON, Ledger publisher | Mar 07, 2011
Fairfield barber Larry Hall works on Norman Kisling’s haircut Monday afternoon at his shop on the northeast corner of the square. Hall celebrates his 50th anniversary at the location Sunday. -JEFF WILSON/Ledger photo

In March 1961, Fairfield barber Larry Hall was busy cutting flat-tops and Elvis Presley pompadours.

Although the styles have changed, Hall is still at it 50 years later in the same location on the northeast corner of the square.

“There were 15 barbers in Fairfield then,” said Hall. “Today it’s just me and Ronnie Fischer. Nobody wants to be a barber any more.”

Long-time Fairfield barber Maynard Barton repurchased the shop on March 13, 1961. He and his father operated Barton’s Barbershop from the early 1930s until it was sold in 1955. Hall, Barton and Dale Bodart manned the three chairs when Fred Erlandson sold the shop back to Barton.

“I can’t remember if we were charging $1 or a $1.25 back then,” said Hall who now charges $15 for a haircut. “A lot of things have changed since then.”

Before the decade was finished, the shop was Larry’s Barber Shop, The Beatles and their shaggy hair had landed in America and women were cutting men’s and boys’ hair.

“Years ago, women couldn’t cut men’s hair,” said Hall. “There were laws against that. They didn’t have a barber’s license. They had a beautician’s license. Several got arrested. But all that changed. I don’t know when.”

The number of barber chairs in Fairfield dwindled quickly.

School policies that restricted the length of boys’ hair to above the collar up until the late 1960s disappeared by the early 1970s.

“Most of our customers were beyond school-age even back then,” said Hall. “And by that time we were missing the Parsons crowd like most other businesses in Fairfield.”

About the time Hall said most of his current customers “aren’t youngsters any more,” Norman Kisling of Stockport walked through the door for a trim.

For the complete article, see the Tuesday, March 8, 2011, printed edition of The Fairfield Ledger.

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