Fairfield Ledger
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Neighbors Growing Together | Nov 29, 2014
INKWELLS & ACRONYMS

FHS career, technical education update: Automotive, industrial technology, more

By DIANE GOUDY, FHS teacher and chairwoman of Career and Technical Education | Apr 01, 2013

Career and Technical (CTE) Education Part I was printed in The Fairfield Ledger March 25 focusing on CTE statistics, Business, and Vocational Agriculture. The emphasis of Part II will be Family and Consumer Science, Industrial Technology, Automotive, Project Lead the Way, and the Carl Perkins grant.

In the FACS department several classes are taught by Heidi Grumwald, including: Foods and Nutrition, Advanced Foods, Parenting and Child Development, Clothing and Merchandising, Independent Living, Housing and Interior Design, and Teen Living.

In Foods and Nutrition the basics of nutrition and measurements are covered, as well as several of the foods groups including: dairy products, eggs, fruits, vegetables, breads and meats. Students will cook a related food item for each of the different units covered.

Advanced Foods is an independent class for those who have completed Foods and Nutrition. In Advanced Foods, students complete chapters of choice and then cook for that particular chapter. (Examples are apple pie, homemade pizza, tiramisu, chocolate torte, bacon stuffed chicken and chocolate chip caramel cookies). Students are able to dig deeper and challenge themselves with the selection of what they cook.

Parenting and Child Development is a class for students to learn about children and what it means to be a good parent. Students take an electronic “Baby Think It Over” home for the weekend to experience a simulation of having a baby in the teenage years. Students in this class also go into the community and attend some of the local preschools to get hands-on experience.

Grunwald recently attended a class called “Servsafe” covering topics such as the importance of food safety including proper temperatures, how to prevent foodborne illnesses, and the importance of proper hand washing. The plan is to incorporate this information more in depth in the Foods and Nutrition class.

Michelle Crandall is the new FMS/FHS FaCS teacher added in August 2012. She teaches at FMS in the morning and FHS Foods classes in the afternoon. She has graduated from SECC with an AA, ISU with a BS in Fashion Merchandising, Iowa Wesleyan College with a BA in Elementary Education and has a FaCS endorsement from ISU. Over the past five years, she was a School Nutrition Project Coordinator for the Iowa State University Des Moines County Extension Office. She taught Nutrition/Physical Activity lessons to 1,250 students twice a month in 53 classrooms at six schools in Burlington and West Burlington. For many years she has sewn elaborate solo dance costumes, Halloween costumes and many window coverings. Michelle lives in Burlington with her husband and two teenage daughters.

At Fairfield High School, Industrial Technology courses also include a wide range of course offerings. Students in Woodworking 1 classes learn about safety and hand tools. Students in Woodworking II classes are doing more design work this year. According to FHS Instructor, Rob Mitchell, students are making a small side table, but they are doing the design work before they build it. Students learn about different furniture styles then do some simple sketching of the table they want to build. Students then learn basic CAD and make simple 3D models of the table they sketched. Finally, students make dimensioned drawings of their table parts to use in the shop when they build their table. Students should understand the design process and understand that this is how products are designed in the real world. The woodworking lab has a new panel saw that was purchased with Carl Perkin’s Grant money. It is very useful when students bring in sheets of plywood to use for a project.

The Project Lead the Way Program has three courses: IE (Intro to Engineering), POE (Principles of Engineering), and DE (Digital Electronics). The PLTW instructors (Rob Mitchell and a new instructor as of this year, Trevor Smith) went to a fall training day in October and heard about updates in the PLTW program.

During recent Engineer’s Week, students presented some design challenges in the lunchroom. Students were required to build a tower out of marshmallows and spaghetti in one challenge. In the other, students had to move radioactive ping pong balls.

PLTW students toured HCM Plastics earlier in the year and Jim Hammes, the owner of HCM Plastics, showed students his facility and how plastic parts are made. Students hope to tour some other businesses before the end of the year.

IED teaches the design process and the curriculum has been revised this year and includes more math problem solving and more small design challenges. DE students are learning how to use AOI logic to design digital circuits. The Education Foundation helped fund the DE program last year with a generous donation to help buy equipment for the class. The Perkins Grant also provided some funding for the DE program by buying a tool to test AOI chips.

POE is an engineering course that exposes students to some of the major concepts they’ll encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering careers and to develop skills and understanding of course concepts, in the areas of energy and power, materials and structures, control systems, statistics, and kinematics. Students develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to others.

POE is an engineering course that exposes students to some of the major concepts they’ll encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering careers and to develop skills and understanding of course concepts, in the areas of energy and power, materials and structures, control systems, statistics, and kinematics. Students develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to others.

Students in Metals Technology learn about the different types of metals and their use in manufacturing and metalworking. Students also study the operation and setup of the major industrial machine tools and their specific metal working techniques and processes. Safety and hand tools are also a big emphasis.

In Power Mechanics I students learn about energy systems and small gas engines. Power Mechanics II is an automotive class, where students concentrate on auto care through servicing, maintenance, and tune-up procedures. Exposure to automotive engine construction and drive-train components, ignition and fuel systems are some of the basic concepts and theories students learn while participating in Power Mechanics II.

Students in Automotive Technology study automotive systems including fuel injection, electronic ignition, hydraulic and pneumatic power systems. Student lab activities include repair and troubleshooting on student or lab vehicles. The Perkins Grant provided some funding for the auto program by purchasing All Data — a software program that allows students to research and troubleshoot their vehicles.

Trevor Smith is a new industrial technology instructor at Fairfield High School. He attended William Penn University, where he studied industrial technology and education. He has experience through various construction and manufacturing positions.

Funds for the CTE programs over the last 20 years are largely received from the Carl Perkins Vocational Grant which requires professional development for the instructors. As is typical of grant applications, planning and documentation are integral parts of being awarded monies. One of the requirements of the grant is an Advisory Committee consisting of community members, employers, students, parents, teachers, and administrators to meet annually. If you would like to be considered for possible addition to this committee, contact information is at the end of this article. Professional development is also a requirement to continue receiving Carl Perkins Grant Funds for CTE department expenditures. Instructors Grunwald/Crandall (FACS) and Goudy (Business) attended the summer ACTE conference in Des Moines for updated information. There were general sessions, as well as break out sessions specific to Business/Computers and Family and Consumer Science.

Finally, grant administrators (Grunwald and Goudy) have recently been involved with the Iowa Department of Education Monitoring visit validating that FHS is effectively following grant guidelines for the improvement of programs and students.

The CTE department values community support in its effectiveness. If you have feedback to offer or want to assist in some way, please contact any CTE instructor directly or by e-mail to the CTE department chair diane.goudy@fairfieldsfuture.org, phone at 641-472-2059; by mail, or in person at FHS, 605 East Broadway Avenue, Fairfield. Thank you for supporting Fairfield Community School District and especially the CTE Department.

 

Diane Goudy is a teacher at the Fairfield High School and chairwoman of Career and Technical Education.

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